Resume/CV Checklist By Susan Resnick

Jan 17 '12

RESUME CHECKLIST

Your Resume represents you, so make it the best. Like all other important documents, your resume must be perfect to be effective. Take out your resume, and check it against this handy checklist. Get The Job You Deserve.

Did you remember to include….

Your legal, proper name? (Not a nickname): Even though my legal name is Susan, I prefer being called Sue. But, Susan still goes on top of my resume.

A Professional email address? Don’t use anything sexual, religious, or political as your email address.  Just use your name: nothing fancy, and easy to remember.

A working telephone number?: It’s frustrating to call a number that’s not working. And there are plenty of other applicants the interviewer has to contact. Next….

All relevant certifications? Whatever gives you a legitimate advantage, use?

An internship—and its duties?  It wasn’t paid work—but, it’s relevant experience.

The complete name of your last employer?  Make sure you get this right.

Positions’ actual titles? (Sales associate, not salesman) for background checks.

Foreign languages and computer proficiencies? Again, more to offer the employer

 

Make sure you leave out….

Work history older than 20 years, aging you: We live in an ageist society.

Dates of Degrees older than 15 years: Employers add years from your grad date.

Personal data: age, weight, and marital status:  Illegal, unethical—and dumb.

Religious and political affiliations: Again, keep religion and politics out of work.

Outdated certifications/education: If they’re invalid, they’re useless.

 

About Susan

Sue Resnick, a frequent contributor to the Orthodox Union Job Board, is the CEO of SGR Career Consulting. An accomplished trainer, she possesses over 15 years of experience, and was graduated from C.W. Post--L.I.U. with Bachelor's and Master's degrees in her field. Sue composes resumes, and conducts workshops in multiple topics of job-readiness training. Her tenet of training: everyone deserves to be employed--and treated like a person, not a number.